Metal

Metal has always been a genre with a great tendency to externalize its identity. All metal contains an aesthetic charge that is more than recognizable: nails, studs, and pointed guitars, all with the ever-present black color. When metal spread and branched out into a multitude of styles during the 1980s, manufacturers decided to put the pedal to the metal when it came to designing guitars specially thought to suit their tastes, although some of the most influential date back long before that metal became popular.

In this article we are going to try to collect the “best” metal guitars. And we say it in quotes, because as those of us who frequent this page know well, the “best” guitar, objectively speaking, does not exist. We are going to talk about the most gender-related, influential, the most deserving for their contribution and the ones that we have ended up seeing more frequently on stage. Of course we can play metal with many other guitars, but these combine the sound, attitude and aggressive look that will make your show the most intimidating in the neighborhood. They are, to understand us, the guitars that we would draw in the caricature of a heavy guitarist.

Most of them continue to be used, although it must be clarified that not all of them remain exactly the same as when they were created. Almost all have been reissued in different shapes and ranges, to suit different pockets. That means, as always, that although we see that a guitar of more than 1,000 euros and another of only 100 may have the same silhouette, and apparently the same characteristics, the similarities are limited to the external appearance. We will have to do a more careful analysis to know what we are buying. With that said, let’s go ahead and list them.

When we said that not all of them belong to the late 70s and 80s, we meant this. The Flying V and the Explorer were two models introduced by Gibson during the 1950s, not being widely accepted. The world was probably not ready for the absolutely disruptive forms of these two guitars, in a world dominated by classical forms. However, the arrival of the “spiky genres” was a boon for these two models, which were warmly welcomed by Heavy Metal bands around the world, from Metallica to Accept, and still used by later bands such as Mastodon or Machine. Head. They are guitars with a glued neck and built in mahogany, qualities associated with a usually thick and solid sound. Although you can find versions with a floating bridge, they usually come in a fixed bridge format, and with double pickups.

Randy Rhoads, one of the most influential guitarists in the Heavy Metal sound, was a great lover of Gibson Les Pauls. However, there is another guitar that we also remember him for, his arrow-shaped Jackson, which would even take his name. Jackson has made countless versions of this model varying the color combinations, the qualities, the type of pickups, the type of bridge, and just about any other modification he could make to this basic silhouette. Randy collaborated very closely with Jackson for the creation of this model, making decisions about the final design, getting to test only the first and second prototype (called Concorde at that time). Shortly after, he died in a plane accident, without getting to know the enormous offspring of the RR model in the Jackson family.

Metal has always been a genre with a great tendency to externalize its identity. All metal contains an aesthetic charge that is more than recognizable: nails, studs, and pointed guitars, all with the ever-present black color. When metal spread and branched out into a multitude of styles during the 1980s, manufacturers decided to put the pedal to the metal when it came to designing guitars specially thought to suit their tastes, although some of the most influential date back long before that metal became popular.

In this article we are going to try to collect the “best” metal guitars. And we say it in quotes, because as those of us who frequent this page know well, the “best” guitar, objectively speaking, does not exist. We are going to talk about the most gender-related, influential, the most deserving for their contribution and the ones that we have ended up seeing more frequently on stage. Of course we can play metal with many other guitars, but these combine the sound, attitude and aggressive look that will make your show the most intimidating in the neighborhood. They are, to understand us, the guitars that we would draw in the caricature of a heavy guitarist.

Most of them continue to be used, although it must be clarified that not all of them remain exactly the same as when they were created. Almost all have been reissued in different shapes and ranges, to suit different pockets. That means, as always, that although we see that a guitar of more than 1,000 euros and another of only 100 may have the same silhouette, and apparently the same characteristics, the similarities are limited to the external appearance. We will have to do a more careful analysis to know what we are buying. With that said, let’s go ahead and list them.

When we said that not all of them belong to the late 70s and 80s, we meant this. The Flying V and the Explorer were two models introduced by Gibson during the 1950s, not being widely accepted. The world was probably not ready for the absolutely disruptive forms of these two guitars, in a world dominated by classical forms. However, the arrival of the “spiky genres” was a boon for these two models, which were warmly welcomed by Heavy Metal bands around the world, from Metallica to Accept, and still used by later bands such as Mastodon or Machine. Head. They are guitars with a glued neck and built in mahogany, qualities associated with a usually thick and solid sound. Although you can find versions with a floating bridge, they usually come in a fixed bridge format, and with double pickups.

Randy Rhoads, one of the most influential guitarists in the Heavy Metal sound, was a great lover of Gibson Les Pauls. However, there is another guitar that we also remember him for, his arrow-shaped Jackson, which would even take his name. Jackson has made countless versions of this model varying the color combinations, the qualities, the type of pickups, the type of bridge, and just about any other modification he could make to this basic silhouette. Randy collaborated very closely with Jackson for the creation of this model, making decisions about the final design, getting to test only the first and second prototype (called Concorde at that time). Shortly after, he died in a plane accident, without getting to know the enormous offspring of the RR model in the Jackson family.

B.C. Rich has always occupied a second row when it comes to top brands in the guitar world. But undoubtedly most guitarists have heard of them, and it’s no wonder – they probably have the most aggressive silhouettes in the business. Although many models could have been the title of this section, we believe that one of the most visible was the Warlock, used for a long time by Thrash guitarists such as Max Cavalera from Sepultura or Kerry King from Slayer. As usual, we can get it at various prices, with or without a floyd rose bridge and with EMG, Seymour Duncan or other brands, but always humbuckers (double pickups). And, actually, sometimes it is built with a screwed neck and others with a glued neck, through, or even with a Speedloader system. We could say that, practically, the only constant in this model is its silhouette made to demolish.


Popularized in a later generation, this is a guitar with a considerably less transgressive appearance, but with quite logical performance. The appearance and some characteristics such as its double cutaway, refer us to classic models such as the Stratocaster, but its thickness, its choice of woods and its construction style is inspired by guitars that are usually darker and denser in tone. The end result is a guitar that, both in its fixed bridge and floyd rose versions, performs well in both solo and rhythmic work in terms of comfort and sound. Also very popular have been its successive versions in 7 and 8 strings.

One of the most important guitars for historical reasons: it is the model with which the late Pantera guitarist, Dimebag Darrell, is associated. Although he started with a Hondo Les Paul, Darrell won the original Dean ML in a contest at the age of 12, beating more than 100 people of all ages. He would later hand it over to luthier Buddy Blaze, who returned it painted with the lightning bolt graphic that all fans of the band know. Talking about the commercial model, from a certain point Darrell signed with Washburn, who would be in charge of making approximately the same guitar. It would not be until decades later when Darrell would sign with Dean, the brand that is currently offering a whole range of products related to the figure of Dimebag. This is a mahogany guitar with a 625mm scale maple neck, 22 frets and glued neck, which can feature DiMarzio / Seymour Duncan pickups and typically a Floyd Rose bridge.


Really, the Ibanez JEM shouldn’t exactly be a metalhead guitar. It is the model popularized by guitarist Steve Vai, a musician who is admired by a wider sector of the guitar-making population, with a strong connection to hard rock and the fusion sound. But when reviewing the specifications of the model, it stops surprising us that this guitar began to massively populate the stages where metal is played: it is a reinterpretation of a Stratocaster, collecting the best of the Super Stratos of the 80 ‘, but adding some ergonomic improvements and with more modern elements. The result was a guitar with a neck that demanded speed, pickups that performed flawlessly with high gains, a floating bridge to unleash exaggerated virguerias, and a striking body-piercing handle, providing the element intended to attract the eye in direct.